Story by Jacob Seelman and Adam Fenwick

Yesterday we posed the question what is a slide job? In addition to that, we also wondered if a slide job has to happen on dirt, or can it occur on an asphalt track?

The question got some interesting responses (and looks) from some of the top dirt racers in the country. Here are Yesterday we posed the question what is a slide job? In addition to that, we also wondered if a slide job has to happen on dirt, or can it occur on an asphalt track? responses.

Sheldon Haudenschild

“Yes, definitely a slide job can be done in NASCAR. You square the corner up, straighten your car out, get a little bit more speed, slow it down in the center and try to beat them off (the corner). I think you can definitely pull a slide job in a pavement car.”

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Matt Sheppard

“I guess anything is possible.”

Mike Marlar

“If Hendrick or one of them guys will call me, I’ll show them!”

Dominic Scelzi

“I definitely think you can. You look at guys like (Kyle) Larson and (Christopher) Bell, they may not be sliding or leading with the rear end, but they’re driving up across the race track and taking somebody’s lane. In my opinion that is the old slide jobber.”

C.J. Leary

“It definitely originated from the dirt-track side of things. I’ve seen some slide jobs on pavement, but I don’t think it’s quite the same.”

Brandon Sheppard

“I don’t know. I guess anything is possible. You can do it, I’d say it’s just a lot more difficult on asphalt than on dirt.”

Tyler Courtney

“You can do it on dirt and asphalt, I think. It’s probably more of a dirt thing, but I think you can watch a stock car race and see the same technicality apply. It’s the same move, they just aren’t actually sliding on pavement like we do on dirt … like the deal with Kyle (Larson) and Kyle (Busch) at Chicagoland.”

Zeb Wise

“You can definitely do it on both dirt and asphalt; I think Kyle Larson has proven that this year. I think we’ve seen multiple slide jobs in the NASCAR world this year, and that’s a lot of fun to see.”

Tanner Carrick

“You can do it on both, it just looks a little different, I’d say.”

Alex Bowman

“It’s different from pavement to dirt. The dirt guys are OK with racing like that, but the pavement guys get a little upset when you race them like that. In the Cup Series, some guys will get mad when you race them like that, but it’s dependent on the situation and just another way to pass.”

Spencer Bayston

“Absolutely, you can do it on both surfaces. Is it viewed as a clean move on pavement? I’m not sure because it’s probably foreign to what they’re used to and what they grew up with, but I think you’re starting to see more of that slide-job mentality … and of course you’ve got the clip of Dale Jr.’s ‘slide job’ call from Larson’s deal at Chicagoland. I think that was proof right there that you can do it in both.”

Ryan Robinson

“Absolutely, you can do them on asphalt, too. I’ve got two teammates (Christopher Bell and Kyle Larson) who have proven that a few times over.”

Carson Macedo

“It’s a lot easier to do on dirt, but I’ve seen Larson a few times do some stuff that takes that same premise. It’s just different and a little tougher to do in the stock cars, I think, because of the air.”

Chase Johnson

“There are certain tracks where you can do it on asphalt, but for me, a slide job has to be where the guy you’re passing is running the top lane. The line of the track has to be up top, and then you can call it a slide job no matter what track you’re racing at.”